Best time to go to Munich

Oktoberfest 2024 in Munich

The most famous beer festival in the world welcomes everyone to enjoy Bavarian culture, rivers of beer, and great traditional cuisine

Dates: September 21–October 6, 2024

Oktoberfest
Oktoberfest
Oktoberfest
Oktoberfest

Being the largest festival of its kind in the world, Oktoberfest runs in Munich, Germany, for 16 to 18 days from mid-September to the first weekend in October. The festival grounds cover an area of 420,000 square meters, featuring over 30 serving tents, hundreds of attractions, tonnes of sausages, and millions of liters of the finest beer. This grand celebration attracts visitors from all over the globe, offering a unique blend of Bavarian culture, cuisine, and entertainment.

Opening Ceremony & Parades (September 21-22, 2024)

Oktoberfest officially begins with the parade of the landlords at 10:45 am on Saturday. The march starts in Josephspitalstraße behind Sendlinger Tor, proceeds to Sonnenstraße, then turns left into Schwanthaler Straße. It continues straight to Bavariaring before heading onto Wirtsbudenstraße and into the respective marquees. At noon, the Lord Mayor opens Oktoberfest in the Schottenhamel Festhalle with the traditional cry of "O'zapft is." The following day, Sunday, September 22, features the traditional costume and hunters parade at 10 am. Known as the Trachten- und Schützenzug, this parade is one of Oktoberfest's highlights, showcasing magnificent floats and historical costumes.

Food

Oktoberfest is an ideal place to indulge in some of the tastiest traditional foods. Festival-goers can savor Hendl (roast chicken), Schweinebraten (roast pork), Schweinshaxe (grilled ham hock), Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick), Würstl (sausages), and giant pretzels and Knödel (dumplings). Among the finest delicacies, be sure to try Obatzda (a spicy cheese-butter spread) and Weißwurst (a white sausage). The sheer scale of the festival is impressive, with over a hundred oxen and more than 500,000 chickens cooked for visitors. Oktoberfest offers a culinary experience that complements its vibrant atmosphere and rich traditions.

Attractions & Concerts

Oktoberfest is not only about drinking and eating; it's also a hub for family fun. The festival features rides that cater to all ages and thrill levels, from swing carousels and high-tech roller coasters to the classic toboggan. Traditional Bavarian music fills almost every tent, but for those looking to dance, the Herzkasperl tent is the place to be. Official family days on the two Tuesdays of the festival last until 7 pm, making it perfect for families to enjoy the festivities together.

A special highlight occurs on the second Sunday of Oktoberfest, September 29, when the festival hosts a grand concert at the foot of the Bavaria statue. Starting at 11 am, bands from all the festival tents unite to perform a unique, free concert for visitors. The festival concludes on Sunday, October 6, with a traditional Bavarian gun salute at noon. Male and female gunners fire their salute from the foot of the Bavaria statue, marking the end of another unforgettable Oktoberfest.

Location, Tickets & Open Hours

Oktoberfest will be held at Munich's Theresienwies. Entry to the festival grounds and all the beer tents is absolutely free. From Monday through Friday, the beer tents open at 10 am and close at 11:30 pm. On Saturdays, Sundays, and the public holiday on October 3rd, the fun begins at 9 am, with the last beer tapping at 11:30 pm. Food stalls, fairground rides, and showmen work from 10 am to midnight daily. During weekdays, the tents are usually full by the afternoon, while during weekends, they will be full by 11 am. Please note that you can't enter the tent after all seats are taken, and no table means no beer.

History of Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest originated on October 12, 1810, celebrating the marriage of the crown prince of Bavaria, who later became King Louis I, to Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen. Every year, 6 to 7 million people visit this incredible event over its two-week duration. Locals often refer to the festival as the Wiesn, named after the festival grounds, Theresienwiese.

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Last updated:
Authors: Sophia Andrus