Best time to travel to Taiwan

Cherry Blossom in Taiwan

Cherry blossom festivities in Taiwan attract about 50,000 tourists every year

Best time: March–April

Cherry Blossom
Cherry Blossom
Cherry Blossom

Cherry blossoms in Taiwan are almost as spectacular as in neighboring Japan. First blooms appear on the island as early as late January. First, cherry trees turn pink in Northern Taiwan. In Taipei city itself, Yangmingshan National Park and Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall are the most popular places to enjoy the cherry blossoms. In the evenings, the trees decorated with lights that create a special romantic atmosphere. If you can travel south, visit Nantou County, where Sun Moon Lake and Formosan Aboriginal Culture Village are the biggest attractions in Central Taiwan with over 2,000 blossoming cherry trees.

Wuling Farm near Taichung city is another great destination with thousands of cherry trees. You can find Japanese varieties like Yaezakura and Oshima trees. There is plenty of guesthouses in the area and hanami-inspired entertainment.

In the southern part of the country, visit Alishan Mountain in Chiayi County. Every spring the Alishan Cherry Blossom Festival features rmore than 19,000 blooming trees (most of them being Yoshino cherries). There are tonnes of activities to celebrate this unique season. Take a ride on the Forest Railway train to enjoy the sight of thousands of trees planted along the tracks. The peak blooming season here is February.

Practical info

When is the ideal time to go to Taiwan if you want to see cherry blossoms?

Late January to April is the ideal time to go to Taiwan if you want to see cherry blossoms. The peak blooming season is normally in February in the southern parts of the country. The first blooms can be seen in Northern Taiwan from late January, and the blooming season lasts for a month and a half from the first bloom until the last fall of petals. Show more

What are some places worth visiting in Taipei to enjoy cherry blossoms?

Yangmingshan National Park and Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall are among the noteworthy places to visit in Taipei to enjoy cherry blossoms. In the evenings, the trees are illuminated, creating a romantic atmosphere. Sun Moon Lake and Formosan Aboriginal Culture Village are also among the central Taiwan's biggest attractions, located around 2 hours' drive from Taipei, with over 2,000 blossoming cherry trees. Show more

What are some cherry tree varieties present at Wuling Farm near Taichung city?

Wuling Farm near Taichung city has thousands of cherry trees including Yaezakura and Oshima trees which are Japanese varieties. You can also find other fruit trees such as peaches, plums, and apples at the farm. Moreover, there are plenty of guesthouses at Wuling Farm where visitors can stay and take in the picturesque views of the farm. Show more

During the cherry blossom festival at Alishan Mountain, when does the peak blooming season happen?

The Alishan Cherry Blossom Festival occurs every spring when over 19,000 trees, mostly Yoshino cherries, bloom. The peak blooming season typically happens in February. The Forest Railway train ride during the festival is an unforgettable experience that offers breathtaking views of the mountain range and sea. Thousands of trees planted along the tracks contribute to the astonishing view as well. Show more

What are some exceptional activities to do during the Alishan Cherry Blossom Festival?

During the Alishan Cherry Blossom Festival, visitors can take advantage of a wide range of activities such as tea ceremonies, live concerts, mountain hikes, and food stalls that feature local delicacies. Furthermore, riding the Forest Railway train to admire the blooming cherry trees is a unique activity visitors can take up. For those who prefer evening activities, a night-time walking tour to see the illuminated trees is also available. Finally, traditional cultural performances showcasing the area's local aboriginal culture can provide another unique and memorable experience for visitors during the festival. Show more

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Last updated: by Eleonora Provozin