Best time to visit Norway

The Atlantic Ocean Road in Norway

This "road to nowhere" is reminiscent of a deadly roller coaster being beset by brutal ocean waves

Best time: September–October

The Atlantic Ocean Road
The Atlantic Ocean Road
The Atlantic Ocean Road
The Atlantic Ocean Road
The Atlantic Ocean Road

The Atlantic Ocean Road, named in Norwegian Atlanterhavsveien, unites a number of small islands scattered across the Norwegian Sea and is claimed to be one of the world's most dangerous roads. It took the constructors 6 years to build the road until it was opened in the summer of 1989, and during that time they suffered 12 hurricanes. The good news is that the road is toll-free.

The dreadful road, which was originally meant to be a railway route, consists of eight bridges, a few causeways, four viewpoints, and even contains several cod fishing spots. The longest bridge stretches over 260 m and is called Storseisundet Bridge (Storseisundetbrua), but also referred to as the "road to nowhere", as it was once named by the Daily Mail. When you ride up the bridge, at some point it actually seems to end up with a precipice. It is also named a "drunken bridge" due to its twists, arches and dips. Tourists choose autumn, namely the time between September and October, to ride along the Atlantic Road, since then it looks particularly sinister with abnormal waves crashing into the bridges from time to time and engulfing the driving cars for a few seconds.

Practical info

When should tourists visit the Atlantic Ocean Road and why?

Tourists looking to experience an adventurous drive along the Atlantic Ocean Road should visit between September and October. During this time, the waves that hit the bridges make the road seem particularly sinister, adding to the excitement of the ride. Additionally, the fall foliage that paints the surrounding landscape is breathtaking, making it an ideal time for visitors looking for a scenic drive in Norway. Show more

Where can the Atlantic Ocean Road be found and what makes it noteworthy?

The Atlantic Ocean Road is located in Norway, along the Norwegian Sea. Known for its dangerous reputation, it connects several small islands and comprises eight bridges, a few causeways, and four viewpoints. The drive offers stunning views of the Norwegian coast and is an ideal destination for tourists looking to experience something unique. Show more

Which bridge is the longest on the Atlantic Ocean Road and why is it significant?

The Storseisundet Bridge, measuring over 260 meters, is the longest bridge on the Atlantic Ocean Road. The bridge is distinctive for its twists, arches, dips, and turns, creating an optical illusion that makes it appear to lead nowhere. It is also known as the 'drunken bridge' and the 'road to nowhere'. Tourists keen to enjoy an exhilarating experience on the Atlantic Ocean Road should not miss driving on this impressive structure while admiring the beauty of the Norwegian Sea. Show more

What are some of the nicknames of the Storseisundet Bridge and why?

The Storseisundet Bridge has gained several nicknames, including the 'drunken bridge', and the 'road to nowhere'. The bridge's design, comprising twists, arches, dips, and turns, make it eerily appear like it leads to a precipice, creating both terror and thrills among drivers. Tourists seeking an unforgettable experience on the Atlantic Ocean Road must drive along this magnificent bridge while taking in the surroundings of the Norwegian Sea. Show more

Why do visitors prefer the autumn season when visiting the Atlantic Ocean Road?

Tourists who choose to explore the Atlantic Ocean Road favor the autumn season, between September and October. During this time, the waves are particularly high, creating an ominous atmosphere along the road. Additionally, visitors can enjoy the dramatic colors of fall foliage that cover the landscape. The autumn season is perfect for those who seek an adventurous and a scenic drive along Norway's Atlantic Ocean Road. Show more

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Last updated: by Eleonora Provozin